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It’s a war on war
It’s a war on war
It’s a war on war
It’s a war on war
It’s a war on war
It’s a war on war
It’s a war on war
There’s a war on

You’re gonna lose
You have to lose
You have to learn how to die

Just watching the miles flying by
Just watching the miles flying by
You are not my typewriter
But you could be my demon
moving forward through the flaming doors

You have to lose
You have to learn how to die
if you want to want to be alive, okay?

You have to lose
You have to lose
You have to learn how to die
if you want to want to be alive

You have to die
You have to die
You have to learn how to die
if you want to want to be alive, okay?

You always hurt the one you love,
The one you shouldn’t hurt at all.
You always take the sweetest rose,
And crush it till the petals fall.

You always break the kindest heart,
With a hasty word you can’t recall.
So, if I broke your heart last night,
It’s because I love you most of all.

 

I suppose I have a thing for uncomfortable melodramas that feature severely unlikable characters (see Margot at the Wedding), but few movies can balance joy and pain, selfishness and selflessness, as well as Jonathan Demme’s crowning achievement. It is as full of as many delights as it is the messy pettiness of a family’s complicated love. Few movies will add to your compassion and tolerance of those grating family members than this one.

“All of life’s questions and answers are in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. It’s about greed and ambition and paranoia and looking at the worst parts of yourself. When I was writing There Will Be Blood, I would put “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre” on before I went to bed at night, just to fall asleep to it.”

-Paul Thomas Anderson

Mike Nichols, the director of The Graduate, had a practice of leaving the camera running long after the scene ended just to see what the actors would do. The original ending of the movie was supposed to be after Ben and Elaine smile at each other, but Nichols liked how their expressions sank so much that he kept the long take thus changing the tone of the movie entirely. The found ending ranks among one of the all time best endings ever.

via

Philosopher’s Stone- 76,944 words
Chamber of Secrets – 85,141 words 
Prisoner of Azkaban
 – 107,253 words
Goblet of Fire – 190,637 words 
Order of the Phoenix
 – 257,045 words 
Half-Blood Prince
 – 168,923 words 
Deathly Hallows
 – 204,796 words

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