You are currently browsing the monthly archive for March 2010.

I’ve watched my share of Star War parodies, but this one ranks high:

Here are three other Star Wars funny things you should be acquainted with.

  • Morther : mor thur : adv : like farther but more, more than. Coined by Archer (age 6).

“I have morther gold stickers.”

  • Lasterday : last ur day : noun/adj/adv : in the recent past. Coined by Jaiken (age 4)

“But he got to sit there lasterday.”

  • Barsting : bar sting : noun/adj : really extremely hot/cold. Etymology: bear sting, meaning big ouchie. Coined by myself and brother Bray many many moons ago.

“Man, it’s barsting out there, grab your coat.”

1. Gripping

2. Poignant: if anything at all sad happens in the book, it will be described as poignant

3. Compelling

4. Nuanced: in reviewerspeak, this means, “The writing in the book is really great. I just can’t come up with the specific words to explain why.”

5. Lyrical: see definition of nuanced, above.

6. Tour de force

7. Readable

8. Haunting

9. Deceptively simple: as in, “deceptively simple prose”

10. Rollicking: a favorite for reviewers when writing about comedy/adventure books

11. Fully realized

12. At once: as in, “Michael Connelly’s The Brass Verdict is at once a compelling mystery and a gripping thriller.” See, I just used three of the most annoying clichés without any visible effort. Piece of cake.

13. Timely

14. ” X meets X meets X”: as in, “Stephen King meets Charles Dickens meets Agatha Christie in this haunting yet rollicking mystery.”

15. Page-turner

16. Sweeping: almost exclusively reserved for books with more than 300 pages

17. That said: as in, “Stephenie Meyer couldn’t identify quality writing with a compass and a trained guide; that said, Twilight is a harmless read.”

18. Riveting

19. Unflinching: used to describe books that have any number of unpleasant occurences — rape, war, infidelity, death of a child, etc.

20. Powerful

via

E pluribus unaum

by Russell Tomlin

The turritopsis nutricula species of jellyfish may be the only animal in the world to have truly discovered the fountain of youth.
Since it is capable of cycling from a mature adult stage to an immature polyp stage and back again, there may be no natural limit to its life span. Scientists say the hydrozoan jellyfish is the only known animal that can repeatedly turn back the hands of time and revert to its polyp state (its first stage of life).
The key lies in a process called transdifferentiation, where one type of cell is transformed into another type of cell. Some animals can undergo limited transdifferentiation and regenerate organs, such as salamanders,which can regrow limbs. Turritopsi nutricula, on the other hand, can regenerate its entire body over and over again. Researchers are studying the jellyfish to discover how it is able to reverse its aging process.
Because they are able to bypass death, the number of individuals is spiking. They’re now found in oceans around the globe rather than just in their native Caribbean waters.  “We are looking at a
worldwide silent invasion,” says Dr. Maria Miglietta of the Smithsonian Tropical Marine Institute.

The turritopsis nutricula species of jellyfish may be the only animal in the world to have truly discovered the fountain of youth.
Since it is capable of cycling from a mature adult stage to an immature polyp stage and back again, there may be no natural limit to its life span. Scientists say the hydrozoan jellyfish is the only known animal that can repeatedly turn back the hands of time and revert to its polyp state (its first stage of life).

The key lies in a process called transdifferentiation, where one type of cell is transformed into another type of cell. Some animals can undergo limited transdifferentiation and regenerate organs, such as salamanders,which can regrow limbs. Turritopsi nutricula, on the other hand, can regenerate its entire body over and over again. Researchers are studying the jellyfish to discover how it is able to reverse its aging process.

Because they are able to bypass death, the number of individuals is spiking. They’re now found in oceans around the globe rather than just in their native Caribbean waters.  “We are looking at a worldwide silent invasion,” says Dr. Maria Miglietta of the Smithsonian Tropical Marine Institute.

via

  • abulia
  • benthos
  • cete
  • distichous
  • exergue
  • fraktur
  • gravid
  • hypocorism
  • invidious
  • jacal
  • kohl
  • legatee
  • mendacious
  • neroli
  • ort
  • peccant
  • quinate
  • rebus
  • suint
  • talion
  • uxorious
  • valgus
  • witenagemot

via

Rhyming is a pretty suspect activity. It’s a bit subversive, isn’t it? We rhyme so that new  ideas can sound somehow familiar, and thereby ring truer. Makes me nervous, that idea.

I was recently reminded that I was nearly finished with a translation of Rilke’s The Beggars. After much searching I’ve found it and have only tweaked in marginally.  My first is found here: Autumn Day and my second is found here: Abishag.

The Beggars

You didn’t know of what that heap
enclosed. The stranger found
beggars there. They hock
the hollows of their hands.

They show that tourist
their mouths, filled with rot,
to see (he can pay the price)
how disease will eat.

In their cruel eyes
his foreign face is marred
and they laugh when he acts
and spit when he tries to speak.

by Rainer Maria Rilke
tr. by Remy Wilkins

[Click below for two other translations]

Read the rest of this entry »

Follow me on the Twittah

  • "I'm glad they don't make Fruit by the Feet, because I couldn't possibly stuff much more into my mouth," I said lyingly. 1 day ago
  • My profile will forever be 80% complete and Facebook hates me for it. Might start a group. 2 days ago
  • Stop Asking About My Education, Facebook, the Answer Is Still "Yes Please" 2 days ago
  • As I sat on the toilet I was attacked by a wasp. It was scary, but killing him really sped things up. 3 days ago
  • Not to brag, but one time I lost very respectably to a chess grandmaster and didn't make fun of how nerdy he was for many seconds. 5 days ago

The Novel I’m Now Reading

Join 465 other followers

March 2010
S M T W T F S
« Feb   Apr »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 465 other followers